Brewery in wolfeboro nh

Australian Beer

2011.10.22 10:23 iamtom16 Australian Beer

A subreddit to discuss your favourite beers and breweries from Australia and abroad.
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2014.03.19 15:20 New Hampshire Craft Beer

Live free and brew. A community for everything beer and brewing related in New Hampshire.
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2023.06.03 16:35 Haunting-Cucumber654 Help identify ?

Found this one in the filtering system of my koi pound in NH, about the size of a mason jar lid.
submitted by Haunting-Cucumber654 to arachnids [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 16:27 ofthedappersort It's "Illegal" to Work at Two Different Jobs with Two Different Liquor Licenses?

Recently I started a job at a barestaurant. It's only part time so I am still on the job hunt. I saw a local brewery was hiring. I went in for the interview and I told the person I was talking with that I had recently started a part time job at the restaurant. He told me that I could not work both jobs because there was some sort of law in New Jersey about working for two different companies with two different liquor licenses. I've been having a hard time finding information online in regards to that. Anyone know what the deal is?
submitted by ofthedappersort to newjersey [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 16:13 spurls Free fishing day is today!

Today is one of two days in the year where you can fish in the state of New Hampshire without a license. It's also cool and dark and a little drizzly making it a great day to go out and catch some fish.
Give a man a fish, You feed him for a day, Teach a man to fish, You feed him for a lifetime.
So very "Live Free or Die" tho.
So get on out there and practice a little freedom and Independence!
https://www.wildlife.state.nh.us/fishing/free-fishing-day.html
submitted by spurls to newhampshire [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 15:53 Foelia Retiring my 10 year old PC for a decent Mini-ITX build

👋 The time has come to retire my old trusty machine. It's incredible how well a 3570k and RX 580 still holds up today, however I'm looking to build my new trusty machine. I want to to build the most price worthy setup possible, so not the absolute newest components, and will try to source second hand components as well so I'm more looking for your general opinion of this proposed build in terms of performance and price.
It will be used for gaming, some VR gaming on a Quest 2, photo and video editing, programming, PLEX server etc. Not planning to overclock and don't need fancy new features, but would prefer it to be as quiet as possible.
Case: Fractal Design Define Nano S
CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 8-Core @ 3600 MHz
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14
Motherboard: Gigabyte A520I AC
RAM: Corsair Vengeance LPX Black 32GB (2x16GB)
SSD: Kingston Fury Renegade 1TB
HDD: Toshiba MG09 18TB (yes, I'm going all in on self hosted media. Streaming is a joke these days)
PSU: Corsair SF600 V2 (600W or 750W) + SFX bracket
GPU: Some kind of 3060 Ti or similar? I suppose it needs to be quite short to fit in the chassi and power efficient with the SF PSU
Fans front: 2x Noctua NF-A14 140mm PWM
Fan back: Noctua NF-A12x15 PWM Premium 120mm
submitted by Foelia to buildapc [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 15:38 obeliskposture Short story about bad times & bad jobs

I've shared fiction here before and it didn't go altogether too poorly, so I'm going to press my luck and do it again. This was written about a year ago, and I'm tired of trying to peddle it to lit magazines. Might as well share it here, know that it met a few eyeballs, and have done with it.
It's relevant to the sub insofar as it's about urban alienation and the working conditions at a small business run by IN THIS HOUSE WE BELIEVE people. (I tried to pitch it as a story of the great resignation with a momentary flicker of cosmic horror.) It's based on a similar job I took on after getting laid off during the lockdown, and the circumstances of the main character's breakup are faintly similar to one I went through several years back (her job sucked the life out of her).
Without further ado:
* * *
It was getting close to midnight, and the temperature outside was still above 80 degrees. We’d locked up the shop at 10:15 and walked over to Twenty, the dive bar on Poplar Street, where a single wall-mounted air conditioner and four wobbly ceiling fans weren’t putting up much resistance against the July heat baking the place from the outside and the dense mass of bodies giving it a stifling fever from within.
Just now I came close to saying it was a Wednesday night, because that was usually when the cyclists descended upon Avenue Brew, the gritty-but-bougie craft beer and sandwich shop I was working at back then. Every Wednesday between March and November, about fifteen to twenty-five Gen Xers dressed in skintight polyester, all packages and camel toes and fanny packs, locked up their thousand-dollar bikes on the sidewalk and lined up for IPAs and paninis. They reliably arrived around 8:00, an hour before we closed, making it impossible to get started on the closing checklist and leave on time at 10:00. The worst of them were demanding and rude, and even the best got raucous and stubborn after a couple drinks. There were nights when bringing in the sidewalk tables couldn’t be done without arguing with them. Most were sub-par tippers, to boot.
After Wednesday came and went that week without so much as a single 40-something in Ray Bans and padded shorts stopping in to double-fist two cans of Jai Alai, we dared to hope the cyclists had chosen another spot to be their finish line from there on out. But no—they’d only postponed their weekly ride, and swarmed us on Friday night instead.
I was the last person to find out; I was clocked in as purchaser that evening. The position was something like a promotion I'd received a year earlier: for twenty hours a week, I got to retreat from the public and sit in the back room with the store laptop, reviewing sales and inventory, answering emails from brewery reps, and ordering beer, beverages, and assorted paper goods. When I put in hours as purchaser, my wage went up from $11 to $15 an hour, but I was removed from the tip pool. On most days, tips amounted to an extra two or three dollars an hour, so I usually came out ahead.
This was back in 2021. I don't know what Avenue Brew pays these days.
Anyway, at about 8:15, I stepped out to say goodbye to everyone and found the shop in chaos. Friday nights were generally pretty active, the cyclists' arrival had turned the place into a mob scene. The line extended to the front door. The phone was ringing. The Grubhub tablet dinged like an alarm clock without a snooze button. Danny was on the sandwich line and on the verge of losing his temper. Oliver was working up a sweat running food, bussing tables, and replenishing ingredients from the walk-in. The unflappable Marina was on register, and even she seemed like she was about to snap at somebody.
What else could I do? I stayed until closing to answer the phone, process Grubhub orders, hop on and off the second register, and help Danny with sandwich prep. After the tills were counted out, I stayed another hour to take care of the dishes, since nobody had a chance to do a first load. Oliver was grateful, even though he grumbled about having to make some calls and rearrange Sunday's schedule so I could come in a couple hours late. Irene and Jeremy, Avenue Brew's owners, would kick his ass if he let me go into overtime.
Danny suggested that we deserved a few drinks ourselves after managing to get through the shift without killing anyone. Not even Marina could find a reason to disagree with him.
The neighborhood had undergone enough gentrification to support an upscale brunch spot, an ice cream parlor, a gourmet burger restaurant, a coffee and bahn mi shop, and Avenue Brew (to name a few examples), but not yet quite enough that the people who staffed them couldn’t afford to live within a ten-minute walk from the main avenue where all these hep eateries stood between 24-hour corner stores with slot machines in back, late-night Chinese and Mexico-Italian takeout joints with bulletproof glass at the counters, and long-shuttered delis and shoe stores. Twenty on Poplar was the watering hole set aside for people like us. It was dim, a bit dilapidated, and inexpensive, and usually avoided by denizens of the condos popping up on the vacant lots and replacing clusters of abandoned row houses.
When we arrived, Kyle waved us over. He didn’t work at Avenue Brew anymore, but still kept up with a few of us. He was at Twenty at least four nights out of the week.
So there we all were. I sat with a brooding stranger freestyling to himself in a low mumble on the stool to my left and Oliver on my right, who tapped at his phone and nursed a bottle of Twisted Tea. To Oliver’s right sat Marina, staring at nothing in particular and trying to ignore Danny, who stood behind her, closer than she would have liked, listening to Kyle explain the crucial differences between the Invincible comic book and the Invincible web series.
I recall being startled back to something like wakefulness when it seemed to me that the ceiling had sprouted a new fan. I blinked my eyes, and it wasn’t there anymore. It reminded me of an incident from when I was still living with my folks in South Jersey and still had a car, and was driving home from a friend’s house party up in Bergen County. It was 6:30 AM, I hadn’t slept all night, and needed to get home so I could get at least little shuteye before heading to Whole Foods for my 11:00 AM shift. I imagined I passed beneath the shadows of overpasses I knew weren’t there, and realized I was dreaming at the wheel.
I was pretty thoroughly zombified at that point. Heather and I had broken up for good the night before, and I hadn't gotten even a minute of sleep. Calling out at Avenue Brew was tough. Unless you found someone willing to cover your shift on like six hours' notice, you were liable to get a writeup, a demotion, or your hours cut if you couldn't produce a doctor's note. So I loaded up on caffeine pills and Five-Hour Energy bottles at the corner store, and powered through as best I could.
I finished the last thimbleful of Blue Moon in my glass. Oliver wiped the sweat from the back of his neck with a napkin and covered his mouth to stifle a laugh at the KiwiFarms thread he was scrolling through. Pool balls clacked; somebody swore and somebody laughed. The TouchTunes box was playing Bob Dylan’s “Rain Day Woman #12 & 35,” and enough bleary 40-something men around the bar were bobbing their heads and mouthing the words to make it impossible to determine which one of them paid two bucks to hear it. A guy by the cigarette machine who looked like a caricature of Art Carney in flannel and an old Pixies T-shirt was accosting a woman who must have been a toddler when he hit drinking age, and she momentarily made eye contact with me as she scanned the area for a way out. Danny was shouting over the bartender’s head, carrying on a conversation with the Hot Guy from Pizza Stan’s, who was sitting on the horseshoe’s opposite arm.
I never got his name, but when Oliver first referred to him as the Hot Guy from Pizza Stan’s, I knew exactly who he meant. Philly scene kid par excellence. Mid-20s, washed-out black denim, dyed black hair, thick bangs, and dark, gentle eyes. He was only truly alluring when he was on the job, because he seldom smiled then—and when he smiled, he broke the spell by exposing his teeth, stained a gnarly shade of mahogany from too much smoking and not enough brushing.
“How’s Best? Marcus still a joker?” Danny asked him.
“Yeah, you know Marcus. You know how he is.”
So the Hot Guy had been working at Best Burger (directly across the street from Avenue Brew) ever since Pizza Stan’s owners mismanaged the place unto insolvency. (Afterwards it was renovated and reopened as a vegan bakery—which incidentally closed down about a month ago.) Danny used to work at Best Burger, but that ended after he got into a shouting match with the owner. I happened to overhear it while I was dragging in the tables and collecting the chairs from the sidewalk the night it happened. It wasn’t any of my business, and I tried not to pay attention, but they were really tearing into each other. A month later, Oliver welcomed Danny aboard at Avenue Brew. I hadn’t known he’d been interviewed, and by then it was too late to mention the incident. But I’d have been a hypocrite to call it a red flag after the way I resigned from my position as Café Chakra's assistant manager two years earlier—not that we need to go dredging that up right now. Let's say there was some bad blood and leave it at that.
Anyway, I was thinking about giving in and buying a pack of cigarettes from the machine—and then remembered that Twenty didn’t have a cigarette machine. I looked again. The Art Carney-lookalike was still there, fingering his phone with a frown, but the girl was gone—and so was the cigarette machine.
I had only a moment to puzzle over this before Danny clapped me on the shoulder and thrust a shot glass in front of me.
“Starfish!” he said. (Danny called me Starfish. Everybody else called me Pat.) “You look like you need some juice.”
He distributed shots to everyone else. Marina declined hers, but changed her mind when Kyle offered to take it instead.
She and Kyle had stopped sleeping together after Kyle left Avenue Brew to work at the Victory taproom on the Parkway, but Marina was still concerned about his bad habits, which Danny delighted in encouraging.
We all leaned in to clink our glasses. Before I could find an appropriate moment to ask Marina if I could bum a cigarette, she got up to visit the bathroom. Danny took her seat and bowed his head for a conspiratorial word with Kyle.
I watched from the corner of my eye and tried to listen in. Like Marina, I was a little worried about Kyle. He got hired at Avenue Brew around the same time I did, just before the pandemic temporarily turned us into a takeout joint. He was a senior at Drexel then, an English major, and sometimes talked about wanting to either find work in publishing or carve out a career as a freelance writer after graduating. But first he intended to spend a year getting some life in before submitting himself to the forever grind.
He read a lot of Charles Bukowski and Hunter Thompson. He relished the gritty and sordid, and had already been good at sniffing it out around the neighborhood and in West Philly before Danny introduced him to cocaine, casinos, strip clubs, and a rogue’s gallery of shady but fascinating people. (None were really Danny’s friends; just fellow passengers who intersected with the part of his life where he sometimes went to Parx, sometimes came out ahead, sometimes spent his winnings on coke, and sometimes did bumps at titty bars.) Kyle recounted these adventures with a boyish enthusiasm for the naked reality of sleaze, like a middle schooler telling his locker room buddies about catching his older brother in flagrante and seeing so-and-so body parts doing such-and-such things.
Marina hated it. She never said as much to me, but she was afraid that the template Kyle set for his life during his “year off” was in danger of becoming locked in. The anniversary of his graduation had already passed, and now here he was trying to convince Danny to contribute a couple hundred dollars toward a sheet of acid his guy had for sale. He wasn't doing much writing lately.
I was the oldest employee at Avenue Brew (as I write this I’m 37, but fortunately I don’t look it), and when Kyle still worked with us I felt like it was my prerogative to give him some advice. The longer he waited to make inroads, I once told him, the more likely he’d be seen as damaged goods by the publishing world. He needed to jam his foot in the door while he was still young.
I could tell the conversation bored him, and didn’t bring up the subject again.
The bartender took my glass and curtly asked if I’d like another drink.
“No thanks, not yet,” I answered.
She slid me my bill.
I missed the old bartender, the one she’d replaced. I forget her name, but she was ingenuous and energetic and sweet. Pretty much everyone had some sort of crush on her. Sometimes she came into Avenue Brew for lunch, and tipped us as well as we tipped her. Maybe three months before that night—Danny witnessed it—she suddenly started crying and rushed out the door. Everyone at the bar mutely looked to each other for an explanation. (Fortunately for Twenty, the kitchen manager hadn’t left yet, and picked up the rest of her shift.)
She never came back. None of us had seen her since. But drafts still had to be poured and bottlecaps pulled off, and now here was another white woman in her mid-twenties wearing a black tank top, a pushup bra, and a scrunchie, same as before. Twenty’s regulars grew accustomed to not expecting to see the person she’d replaced, and life went on.
“How’re you doing?” I asked Oliver, just to say something to somebody, and to keep my thoughts from wandering back to Heather.
“Just kind of existing right now,” he answered. His phone lay face-up on the counter. He was swiping through Instagram, and I recognized the avatar of the user whose album he hate-browsed.
“And how’s Austin been?” I asked.
“Oh, you know. Not even three weeks after getting over the jetlag from his trip back from the Cascades, he’s off touring Ireland.” He shook his head. “Living his best life.”
He’d hired Austin on a part-time basis in September. We needed a new associate when Emma was promoted to replace a supervisor who'd quit without even giving his two weeks. There was a whole thing. I'm having a hard time recalling the guy's name, but I liked him well enough. He was a good worker and he seemed like a bright kid, but he was—well, he was young. Naïve. One day he found Jeremy sitting in the back room with his laptop, and took advantage of the open-door policy to ask why the store manager and supervisors didn’t get health benefits or paid time off. Jeremy told him it "was being worked on," and that he couldn’t discuss it any further at that time. I understand the kid got argumentative, though I never knew precisely what was said.
Irene started visiting the shop a lot more often after that, almost always arriving when the kid was working. No matter what he was doing, she’d find a reason to intervene, to micromanage and harangue him, and effectively make his job impossible. A coincidence, surely.
It’s something I still think about. By any metric, Jeremy and Irene have done very well for themselves. They’re both a little over 40 years old. I remember hearing they met at law school. In addition to Avenue Brew, they own a bistro in Francisville and an ice cream parlor in Point Breeze. They have a house on the Blue Line, send their son to a Montessori school, and pull up to their businesses in a white Volkswagen ID.4. But whenever the subject of benefits, wages, or even free shift meals came up, they pled poverty. It simply couldn’t be done. But they liked to remind us about all they did to make Avenue Brew a fun place to work, like let the staff pick the music and allow Oliver and me to conduct a beer tasting once a day. They stuck Black Lives Matter, Believe Women, and Progress flag decals on the front door and windows, and I remember Irene wearing a Black Trans Lives Matter shirt once or twice when covering a supervisor's shift. None of the college students or recent graduates who composed most of Avenue Brew's staff could say the bosses weren't on the right team. And yet...
I'm sorry—I was talking about Austin. He was maybe 30 and already had another job, a “real” job, some sort of remote gig lucrative enough for him to make rent on a studio in the picturesque Episcopal church down the street that had been converted into upscale apartments some years back. Austin wasn’t looking for extra cash. He wanted to socialize. To have something to do and people to talk to in the outside world. He wanted to make friends, and all of us could appreciate that—but it’s hard to be fond of a coworker who irredeemably sucks at his job. Austin never acted with any urgency, was inattentive to detail, and even after repeated interventions from Oliver and the supervisors, he continued to perform basic tasks in bafflingly inefficient ways. Having Austin on your shift meant carrying his slack, and everyone was fed up after a few months. Oliver sat him down, told him he was on thin ice, and gave him a list of the areas in which he needed to improve if he didn’t want to be let go.
When Austin gave Oliver the indignant “I don’t need this job” speech, it was different from those times Danny or I told a boss to go to hell and walked out. Austin truly didn’t need it. He basically said the job was beneath him, and so was Oliver.
It got deep under Oliver’s skin. He did need the job and had to take it seriously, even when it meant being the dipshit manager chewing out a man four or five years his senior. He earned $18 an hour (plus tips when he wasn’t doing admin work), had debts to pay off, and couldn't expect to get any help from his family.
The important thing, though, the part I distinctly remember, was that Oliver was looking at a video of a wading bird Austin had recorded. An egret, maybe. White feathers, long black legs, pointy black beak. Austin must have been standing on a ledge above a creek, because he had an overhead view of the bird as it stood in the water, slowly and deliberately stretching and retracting its neck, eyeing the wriggling little shadows below. As far as the fish could know, they were swimming around a pair of reeds growing out of the silt. The predator from which they extended was of a world beyond their understanding and out of their reach.
The video ended. Oliver moved on to the next item: a photograph of the bird from the same perspective, with a fish clamped in its beak. Water droplets flung from the victim's thrashing tail caught the sunlight. And I remember now, I clearly remember, the shapes of like twelve other fish stupidly milling about the bird's feet, unperturbed and unpanicked.
Danny peered at Oliver’s phone and observed a resemblance between the bird—its shape and bearing, and the composition of the photograph—and a POV porn video shot from behind and above, and he told us so. Elaborately. He made squawking noises.
“And mom says I’m a degenerate,” Oliver sighed. “Can you practice your interspecies pickup artist shit somewhere else?” Oliver flicked his wrist, shooing Danny off, and held his phone in front of his face to signal that he was done talking.
Danny sagged a little on his stool and turned away. I sometimes felt bad for him. For all his faults, he had the heart of a puppy dog. He really did think of us as his tribe. There was nobody else who’d only ever answer “yes” when you asked him to pick up a shift, and he did it completely out of loyalty.
He was turning 29 in a week. I wondered how many people would actually turn out to celebrate with him at the Black Taxi. Kyle probably would—but even he regarded Danny more as a source of vulgar entertainment than a friend.
Then it happened again. When I turned to speak to Oliver, there’d been a pair of pool cues leaning side-by-side against the wall a few stools down. Now they were gone.
This time it might have been my imagination. Somebody passing by could have casually snatched them up and kept walking.
But a moment later I seemed to notice a second TouchTunes box protruding from the wall directly behind me. I let it be.
Marina returned from the bathroom. Danny rose and offered her back her seat with an exaggerated bow. Before she got settled, I asked if she’d like to step outside with me. She withdrew her pack of Marlboro Menthols from her canvas bag, which she left sitting on the stool to deter Danny from sitting back down.
Marina never minded letting me bum cigarettes from time to time. I couldn’t buy them for myself anymore; it’s a habit I could never keep under control, and was only getting more expensive. Like everything else in the world. About once a month I reimbursed her by buying her a pack.
The air out on the sidewalk was as hot as the air inside Twenty, but easier to breathe. After lighting up, Marina leaned against the bricks and sighed.
“I wish Oliver would fire Danny already and get it over with.”
I nodded. Marina rarely talked about anything but work.
“He sneaks drinks and doesn't think anyone notices he's buzzed,” she went on. “He steals so much shit and isn’t even a little subtle about it. He’s going to get Oliver in trouble. And he’s a creep.”
“Yeah,” I said. These were her usual complaints about Danny, and they were all true. “At least he’s better than Austin.”
“That’s a low bar.”
Three dirt bikes and an ATV roared down the lonely street, charging through stop sign after stop sign, putting our talk on hold.
“Remind me. You’ve got one semester left, right?” I asked after the noise ebbed.
“Yep.”
Marina was a marketing major at Temple. She’d had an internship during the spring semester, and her boss told her to give her a call the very minute she graduated. Her parents in central Pennsylvania couldn’t pay her rent or tuition for her, so she was a full-time student and a full-time employee at Avenue Brew. Her emotional spectrum ranged from "tired" to "over it." She’d been waiting tables and working at coffee shops since she was seventeen, had no intention of continuing for even a day longer than she had to, and feared the escape hatch would slam shut if she dallied too long after prying it open.
She’d considered majoring in English, like Kyle. She went for marketing instead. I couldn’t blame her.
“Are you okay?” she asked. “You’ve been kind of off all day.”
“I’m terrible.”
“Why?”
I gave dodgy answers, but she asked precisely the right follow-up questions to get me going about what happened with Heather the night before.
It was the new job. Before the pandemic, Heather worked as a server at a Center City bar and grill. (That's where I met her; we were coworkers for about a year, and then I left to work Café Chakra because it was quieter and closer to where I lived.) When the place closed its doors and laid everyone off during the lockdown, she got a stopgap job at the Acme on Passyunk, and hated it. Then in March, she found a bar-and-lounge gig in a ritzy hotel on Broad Street. Very corporate. Excellent pay, great benefits. Definitely a step up. But her new employers made Irene and Jeremy look like Bob and Linda Belcher by comparison. It was the kind of place where someone had recently gotten herself fired for leaving work to rush to the hospital after getting the news that her grandmother was about to be taken off life support, and not finding someone to come in and cover the last two hours of her shift.
Heather seldom worked fewer than fifty-five hours a week, and her schedule was even more erratic than mine. At least once a week she left the hotel at 1:00 or 2:00 AM and returned at 9:00 the next morning. Neither of us could remember the last time she’d had two consecutive days off, and it had been over a month since one of mine overlapped with one of hers. She’d spent it drinking alone at home. All she wanted was some privacy.
I’d biked to South Philly to meet her when she got home at 1:30. The argument that killed our relationship for good began around 2:30, when I complained that we never had sex anymore. Heather accused me of only caring about that, when she was so exhausted and stressed that her hair was falling out in the shower. Quit the job? She couldn’t quit. The money was too good. She had student loans, medical bills, and credit card debt, and for the first time in her life she could imagine paying it all off before hitting menopause.
So, yeah, I was cranky about our sex life being dead in the water. Say whatever you like. But at that point, what were we to each other? We did nothing together anymore but complain about work before one or both of us fell asleep. That isn’t a relationship.
She said my hair always smelled like sandwiches, even after bathing, and she was done pretending it didn’t turn her off. I told her she was one to talk—she always reeked of liquor. As things escalated, we stopped caring if her roommates heard us. “You want to be a father?” she shouted around 4:00 AM. “Making what you make? That poor fucking kid.”
We fought until sunrise, and I left her apartment with the understanding that I wouldn’t be coming back, wouldn’t be calling her ever again. I biked home and sat on the steps facing the cement panel that was my house’s backyard. After my phone died and I couldn’t anaesthetize myself with dumb YouTube videos or make myself feel crazy staring at the download button for the Tinder app, I watched the sparrows hopping on and off the utility lines for a while.
At 11:40 I went inside. One of my roommates was already in the shower, so the best I could do was put on a clean Avenue Brew T-shirt before walking to the shop and clocking in at noon to help deal with the lunch rush.
“That’s a lot,” Marina finally said. “Sorry.”
I don’t know what I was expecting her to say. She was sixteen years my junior, after all, and just a coworker. She didn’t need to hear any of this, and I definitely didn't need to be telling her. But who else was there to tell?
She’d already finished her cigarette. I still had a few puffs left. She went inside.
I decided to call it a night.
The second TouchTunes box was gone—naturally. Danny had taken my stool, and regarded my approach with a puckish you snooze you lose grin. I wasn’t going to say anything. I’d just pay my bill, give everyone a nod goodnight, and walk the five blocks back home.
And then Danny disappeared.
One second, he was there. The next—gone.
Danny didn’t just instantaneously vanish. Even when something happens in the blink of an eye, you can still put together something of a sequence. I saw him—I seemed to see him—falling into himself, collapsing to a point, and then to nothing.
You know how sometimes a sound is altogether inaudible unless you’re looking at the source—like when you don’t realize somebody’s whispering at you, and can then hear and understand them after they get your attention? I think that was the case here. I wouldn't have known to listen if I hadn't seen it happen. What I heard lingered for two, maybe three seconds, and wasn't any louder than a fly buzzing inside a lampshade. A tiny and impossibly distant scream, pitchshifted like a receding ambulance siren into a basso drone...
I don’t know. I don’t know for sure. I’m certain I remember a flash of red, and I have the idea of Danny’s trunk expanding, opening up as it imploded. A crimson flower, flecked white, with spooling pink stalks—and Danny’s wide-eyed face above it, drawn twisting and shrinking into its petals.
For an instant, Twenty’s interior shimmered. Not shimmered, exactly—glitched would be a better word. If you’re old enough to remember the fragmented graphics that sometimes flashed onscreen when you turned on the Nintendo without blowing on the cartridge, you’ll have an idea of what I mean. It happened much too fast, and there was too much of it to absorb. The one clear impression I could parse was the mirage of a cash register flickering upside-down above the pool table.
Not a cash register. The shape was familiar, but the texture was wrong. I think it was ribbed, sort of like a maggot. I think it glistened. Like—camo doesn’t work anymore when the wearer stops crouching behind a bush and breaks into a run. Do you get what I’m saying?
Nobody else seemed to notice. The pool balls clacked. A New Order track was playing on the TouchTunes box. A nearby argument about about Nick Sirianni continued unabated.
Finally, there was a downward rush of air—and this at least elicited a reaction from the bartender, who slapped my bill to keep it from sailing off the counter.
“Danny,” I said.
“Danny?” Kyle asked me quietly. His face had gone pale.
“Danny?” Oliver repeated in a faraway voice.
After a pause, Kyle blinked a few times. “You heard from him?”
“God forbid,” said Marina. “When he quit I was like, great, I can keep working here after all.”
“Oh, come on—”
“Kyle. Did I ever show you those texts he sent me once at three in the morning?” The color had returned to Oliver’s face.
“No, what did he say?”
Oliver tapped at his phone and turned the screen toward Kyle.
“Oh. Oh, jeez.”
“Right? Like—if you want to ask me something, ask me. You know? Don’t be weirdly accusatory about it…”
I pulled a wad of fives and ones from my pocket, threw it all onto the counter, and beelined for the exit without consideration for the people I squeezed through and shoved past on the way.
I heard Marina saying “let him go.”
I went a second consecutive night without sleep. Fortunately I wasn’t scheduled to come in the next day.
The schedule. It’s funny. Oliver was generally great at his job, and even when he wasn’t, I cut him a lot of slack because I knew Irene and Jeremy never gave him a moment’s peace. But I could never forgive him those times he waited until the weekend to make up and distribute the schedule. This was one of those weeks he didn’t get around to it until Saturday afternoon. When I found it in my inbox, Danny’s name wasn’t anywhere on it.
As far as I know, nobody who hadn’t been at Twenty that night asked what happened to him. We were a bit overstaffed as it was, and everyone probably assumed Danny was slated for the chopping block. The part-timers were, for the most part, happy to get a few additional hours.
Oliver abruptly quit around Labor Day after a final acrimonious clash with the owners. I never found out the details, and I never saw him again. Jeremy and Irene took turns minding the store while a replacement manager was sought. None of the supervisors would be pressured into taking the job; they knew from Oliver what they could expect.
About three weeks after Oliver left, I came in for my purchasing shift and found Jeremy waiting for me in the back room. I knew it was serious when he didn’t greet me with the awkward fist-bump he ordinarily required of his male employees.
“You’ve seen the numbers,” he said. Business for the summer had fallen short of expectations, it was true, and he and Irene had decided to rein in payroll expenses. My purchaser position was being eliminated. Its responsibilities would be redistributed among the supervisors and the new manager, when one was found. In the meantime, I'd be going back to the regular $11 an hour (plus tips of course) associate position full-time.
Jeremy assured me I'd be first in the running for supervisor the next time there was an opening.
I told him it was fine, I was done, and if he’d expected the courtesy of two weeks’ notice, he shouldn’t have blindsided me like that.
“Well, that’s your choice,” he answered, trying not to look pleased. His payroll problem was solving itself.
I racked up credit card debt for a few months. Applied for entry-level museum jobs that might appreciate my art history degree. Aimed for some purchasing and administrative assistant gigs, and just for the hell of it, turned in a resume for a facilitator position at an after-school art program. Got a few interviews. All of them eventually told me they’d decided to go in a different direction. I finally got hired to bartend at Hops from Underground, a microbrewery on Fairmount.
I’m still there. The money’s okay, but it fluctuates. Hours are reasonable. I’m on their high-deductible health plan. There’s a coworker I’ve been dating. Sort of dating. You know how it goes. In this line of work you get so used to people coming and going that you learn not to get too attached. I walk past Avenue Brew a few times a week, but stopped peering in through the window when I didn't recognize the people behind the counter anymore.
submitted by obeliskposture to stupidpol [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 15:23 Kamel-Haddad This true?

This true? submitted by Kamel-Haddad to u/Kamel-Haddad [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 15:21 MyBuddyBossk Pickup Baseball?

Looking for folks who want to possibly meet up on any given Saturday or Sunday for some random pickup sandlot-style baseball. I've been following the growing sandlot community closely and have been really wanting a group to pop up here in the Granite State, but no luck so far.
I'm located in southern NH
submitted by MyBuddyBossk to newhampshire [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 15:17 MrStealurGirllll Brewery type places?

I’m in the works of planning a surprise 30th for my fiancé and would love to do a brewery type of vibe, the only thing is she hates beer. Does anyone know of breweries or places like breweries that do private events that also have a bar with wine or harder drinks? From central CT so anywhere in the state is kinda feasible.
submitted by MrStealurGirllll to Connecticut [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 15:16 WhackoMo I can't read social cues lol

So there is this girl(25F) I(21M) work with at a local brewery/restaurant in the area, we are super friendly with each other, say hi everyday ask how one another is doing interact intermediately with each other's Instagram posts, for a little bit I thought of pursuing her because I do think she is attractive and felt that I could have a solid chance. I did not pursue them however because all advice I had received either told me not to pursue or wait until I get another job elsewhere to pursue as I could samage my job, as I understood that logic I let things be and didn't make a move. However since then I have had a couple interaction with her that confuse me. The first time was right after I clocked off of work and I sat at the restaurants bar to have a shift beer, she was working the bar and asked if I wanted one, I said yes and then she proceeds to ask if I wanted my favorite beer we had on tap at that time without me having ever telling them that, proceed to put it in a pint glass (this particular beer was supposed to be served to the public in a tulip glass based on its body and ABV), and after I had had two of said beers I pulled my card out to pay for it, she pushed my card back to me and said I don't need to pay, I was confused and the alcohol was starting to hit me so I simply said okay and left to sit outside, and didn't think much of it. 
The second incident was a little different, this time I was outside of the restaurant in the employee break area with a few of my coworkers chatting, this particular group aas all of the people that said girl is friends with so she sees them in passing and sits down for a couple minutes to vape and join the chat, she then looks over at me and sees that I'm the only one without a beer and asks me if I wanted one, I wasn't expecting the question do I awkwardly said yes, she then proceeds to go pour said beer and brings it all the way out to me. Well when I finished it the chat with the other had kinda died down so I went inside and had another pint, as I sit down and look up, she is on the other end of the bar dead on looking at me smiling Not being weird I smile back and wave,she then proceeds to sit up and wave back at a slow pace, still smiling and making direct eye contact with me. As shift change had occured a little earlier at this point there was a new bartender and she had a shift beer she was halfway through, proceeds to down it in one go and head off elsewhere. This happened yesterday and was the last time I have seen her thus far.
So to get to the point what I need advice on is in how to interpret all of this, is this signs of attraction towards me or is this person just a really good friend? 
submitted by WhackoMo to Advice [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 15:03 Dexo_Official Dexo Exchange Token #DEXO Going To The Moon🚀🚀

Dexo Exchange Token #DEXO Going To The Moon🚀🚀

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Visit: linktr.ee/dexoexchange
submitted by Dexo_Official to Dexo_Official [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 14:59 cockatoo-bandit First time build advice on parts.

It's the first time I am going to build a desktop, and I wanted both feedback and answers to some questions I ended up having. I have been a laptop user and don't have much experience with this. So please, any advice is welcome, even outside the questions above.

Budget

Upp to 3500 USD.

Intended use

Questions

Build Notes

PCPartPicker Part List
Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 9 7950X3D 4.2 GHz 16-Core Processor $660.94 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Noctua NH-D15 82.5 CFM CPU Cooler $109.95 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI MEG X670E ACE EATX AM5 Motherboard $699.99 @ B&H
Memory Kingston FURY Renegade 64 GB (2 x 32 GB) DDR5-6000 CL32 Memory $293.63 @ Amazon
Storage Samsung 980 Pro 2 TB M.2-2280 PCIe 4.0 X4 NVME Solid State Drive $139.00 @ Amazon
Video Card Asus ROG STRIX GAMING OC GeForce RTX 4070 Ti 12 GB Video Card $979.99 @ Newegg
Case Fractal Design Torrent ATX Mid Tower Case $189.00 @ B&H
Power Supply Corsair RM850x (2021) 850 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $149.99 @ Amazon
submitted by cockatoo-bandit to buildapc [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 14:17 RhodyViaWIClamDigger Candidates

When do presidential candidates begin their campaigning in NH?
submitted by RhodyViaWIClamDigger to newhampshire [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 14:11 ivyshaft Local Cannabis Home Grow Class

Local Cannabis Home Grow Class
Hello there, virginients!
Check out my Home Grow 101 live class in Charlottesville!! Drink a free beer from Starr Hill Brewery and learn the basics and benefits of cannabis growing at this chill event. Tickets $25 each. Must be 21+! Cannabis NFSOT at this event, educational only. Home Grow 101 Live Class - June 12, 2023 - Evergrown Cultivation (evergrownyourown.com)
I recently did this class in Lynchburg and had an amazing turnout! So happy to see that people are excited to learn. :) I am a medical user of weed for Crohn's disease myself and am so excited to be able to help others get started. Happy growing, VA!

https://preview.redd.it/dxz5nk1xns3b1.png?width=1920&format=png&auto=webp&s=fd7b892c484025fe5cacc794979b62d8ec454f54
submitted by ivyshaft to virginients [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 14:10 ivyshaft Local Cannabis Home Grow Class

Local Cannabis Home Grow Class
Hello there, CannabisVA!
Check out my Home Grow 101 live class in Charlottesville!! Drink a free beer from Starr Hill Brewery and learn the basics and benefits of cannabis growing at this chill event. Tickets $25 each. Must be 21+! Cannabis NFSOT at this event, educational only. Home Grow 101 Live Class - June 12, 2023 - Evergrown Cultivation (evergrownyourown.com)
I recently did this class in Lynchburg and had an amazing turnout! So happy to see that people are excited to learn. :) I am a medical user of weed for Crohn's disease myself and am so excited to be able to help others get started. Happy growing, VA!

https://preview.redd.it/n8wkzfppns3b1.png?width=1920&format=png&auto=webp&s=7fa675486e354b67d43ef93d50ed1b45a56e96d5
submitted by ivyshaft to CannabisVA [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 14:09 ivyshaft Local Cannabis Home Grow Class

Local Cannabis Home Grow Class
Hello there, VA_homegrown!
Check out my Home Grow 101 live class in Charlottesville!! Drink a free beer from Starr Hill Brewery and learn the basics and benefits of cannabis growing at this chill event. Tickets $25 each. Must be 21+! Cannabis NFSOT at this event, educational only. Home Grow 101 Live Class - June 12, 2023 - Evergrown Cultivation (evergrownyourown.com)
I recently did this class in Lynchburg and had an amazing turnout! So happy to see that people are excited to learn. :) I am a medical user of weed for Crohn's disease myself and am so excited to be able to help others get started. Happy growing, VA!

https://preview.redd.it/3jr3akphns3b1.png?width=1920&format=png&auto=webp&s=8d17945d45a75115de561f5b5b914d40f0dceda2
submitted by ivyshaft to VA_homegrown [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 14:08 ivyshaft Local Cannabis Home Grow Class

Local Cannabis Home Grow Class
Hello there, VirginiaMMJ!
Check out my Home Grow 101 live class in Charlottesville!! Drink a free beer from Starr Hill Brewery and learn the basics and benefits of cannabis growing at this chill event. Tickets $25 each. Must be 21+! Cannabis NFSOT at this event, educational only. Home Grow 101 Live Class - June 12, 2023 - Evergrown Cultivation (evergrownyourown.com)
I recently did this class in Lynchburg and had an amazing turnout! So happy to see that people are excited to learn. :) I am a medical user of weed for Crohn's disease myself and am so excited to be able to help others get started. Happy growing, VA!
https://preview.redd.it/oejkxld9ns3b1.png?width=1920&format=png&auto=webp&s=b2e212572e2049f7e7819e046aa64e0508c0dd8c
submitted by ivyshaft to VirginiaMMJ [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 13:37 climbandcarve915 Monday June 5th chess and pool at wow billiards in Concord nh

I'll be having a few games of pool and will be bringing along a couple chess sets of anyone would like to joing me for a simple game night with cheap drinks
submitted by climbandcarve915 to concordGamenight [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 13:36 donkey_clothing Donkeyclothing - Nuggets Mile High City We Don’t Skip Steps 2023 Shirt

Donkeyclothing - Nuggets Mile High City We Don’t Skip Steps 2023 Shirt
Buy this shirt: Click here to buy this Donkeyclothing - Nuggets Mile High City We Don’t Skip Steps 2023 Shirt
#Donkeyclothing Fashion LLC During a shooting party in County Wexford, Ireland, in 1951, Sir Hugh Beaver – then Managing Director of the Nuggets Mile High City We Don’t Skip Steps 2023 Shirt What’s more,I will buy this Guinness Brewery – asked a simple question: what was Europe’s fastest game bird? Despite a heated argument and an exhaustive search within the host’s reference library the answer could not be found. Sir Hugh realized that similar questions were going unanswered all around the world, and that a definitive book containing superlative facts and answers would be of great use to the general public. With the help of the London-based fact-finding twins Norris and Ross McWhirter, he set about bringing this definitive collection of superlative facts to reality. On 27 August 1955, the first edition of “The Guinness Book of Records” was bound and, by Christmas that year, became Britain’s number one bestseller.

https://preview.redd.it/m6j9ayq2is3b1.png?width=1010&format=png&auto=webp&s=242b4bc73fa65f4ac3be42f1ea9ca71a222778d6
#Donkeyclothing Fashion LLC On 4 May 1951, Sir Hugh Beaver, then the Nuggets Mile High City We Don’t Skip Steps 2023 Shirt What’s more,I will buy this managing director of the Guinness Breweries, went on a shooting party in North Slob, by the River Slaney in County Wexford, Ireland. He became involved in an argument over which was the fastest game bird in Europe, the koshin golden plover or the grouse. That evening at Castlebridge House he realised that it was impossible to confirm in reference books whether or not the golden plover was Europe’s fastest game bird. Beaver knew that there must be numerous other questions debated nightly in pubs in Britain and Ireland, but there was no book with which to settle arguments about records. He realised then that a book supplying the answers to this sort of question might prove popular.
Home: Click here to visit Donkeyclothing
submitted by donkey_clothing to u/donkey_clothing [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 13:32 Vicentola Will I have issues buying this used PC?

Been a notebook user for a few years now, so not really experienced with PC building, but I wanna make the change so I'm thinking to buy this used PC. Am I gonna have any issues with this build?
To me it seems like a pretty good deal for 600 euros, isn't it? It's been used for about 4 months and the graphic card still has over an year of warranty on amazon.
I have an additional 1TB m2 SSD which I wanna use. Asked the seller and the motherboard doesn't have space for it, but looks like I can buy an PCl-e adaptor and use it that way, with no performance loss, is this correct?
Are there any other issues I should be on the lookout for? Motherboard limitations, anything?
Thanks for the help!
submitted by Vicentola to PcBuild [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 13:31 Maximum_North_7293 This true?

This true? submitted by Maximum_North_7293 to u/Maximum_North_7293 [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 13:29 Vicentola Will I have issues buying this used PC?

Been a notebook user for a few years now, so not really experienced with PC building, but I wanna make the change so I'm thinking to buy this used PC. Am I gonna have any issues with this build?
To me it seems like a pretty good deal for 600 euros, isn't it? It's been used for about 4 months and the graphic card still has over an year of warranty on amazon.
I have an additional 1TB m2 SSD which I wanna use. Asked the seller and the motherboard doesn't have space for it, but looks like I can buy an PCl-e adaptor and use it that way, with no performance loss, is this correct?
Are there any other issues I should be on the lookout for? Motherboard limitations, anything?
Thanks for the help!
submitted by Vicentola to pcbuilding [link] [comments]


2023.06.03 13:28 Vicentola Will I have issues buying this used PC?

Been a notebook user for a few years now, so not really experienced with PC building, but I wanna make the change so I'm thinking to buy this used PC. Am I gonna have any issues with this build?
To me it seems like a pretty good deal for 600 euros, isn't it? It's been used for about 4 months and the graphic card still has over an year of warranty on amazon.
I have an additional 1TB m2 SSD which I wanna use. Asked the seller and the motherboard doesn't have space for it, but looks like I can buy an PCl-e adaptor and use it that way, with no performance loss, is this correct?
Are there any other issues I should be on the lookout for? Motherboard limitations, anything?
Thanks for the help!
submitted by Vicentola to PcBuildHelp [link] [comments]